Changing Environments

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I have a very bad habit of driving somewhere, putting my vehicle in park, and sitting in the vehicle for a while before I get out. Sometimes, I do this because I’m listening to sports radio and want to hear the end of the thought being expressed, or maybe I’m just moving slow that day. But occasionally, I hesitate because I don’t want to trade one climate for the other.

If it is bitterly cold outside, then the warmth of my vehicle is too appealing.

If it is raining, I dread stepping out into the rain. (This one doesn’t happen very often as we rarely get rain.)

If the heat outside is blistering, then the allure of the A/C can be too much.

In leadership, we have to be careful about developing a similar habit.

We may find ourselves waiting outside a meeting where we know the atmosphere will be chilled by attitudes.

Or maybe we hesitate to call an important meeting because we fear what may take place.

Or we put off having a tough conversation out of fear the conversation will go to a dangerous place.

Understand this: if you are in a position of leadership, find the balance between looking for problems to blow up and hiding from situations that scare you. You do not have to become a bulldog that tears into every conflict with glee, but you also cannot afford to be a turtle who hides in your shell at the first sign of unpleasantness.

As a leader, someone has placed trust in you to lead, so make the most of that trust.

Over the years, I have found that when I hesitate to do something, my hesitation is a key indicator the something needs to be done. I seldom worry and put off things that do not matter. Is that true for you? What are your own signs of the need for something to be done?

Teaching Student Leaders

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Last weekend, I had the privilege of hosting a Student Leadership Workshop. We had three churches come together, with a total of 21 students, and we spent a good part of the day equipping students to become better leaders.

To close the workshop, I borrowed a Habitude from Tim Elmore (click here to read about him). I asked students if they were a thermostat or thermometer.

Thermometers take the temperature of the room and reflect it. They do not control how hot or cold something is, but instead passively reveal the current state.

Thermostats set the temperature of the room. They determine how hot or cold a room is at the moment, and what it will be in the future.

My dream for student leaders is that they realize they have the potential to become a thermostat and set the temperature of the room through their actions, their behaviors, and their interactions with other people.

I love watching student leaders step up and lead. Few things compare with watching teenagers begin to realize they’re not too young to make a difference.

In my own life, I personally would like to become more of a thermostat than a thermometer. What about you?

It’s Okay to Hope

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Have you ever set a New Year’s Resolution?

Have you ever chosen not to set a New Year’s Resolution?

Have you ever claimed “My New Year’s Resolution is to not have any New Year’s Resolutions”?

A few years ago, I felt guilty for ever getting excited and setting some goals for the new year. It seemed every conversation covering resolutions took on a significantly negative tone. And I bought into it.

Then, I read a blog where someone said they always looked forward to the new year and the hope that it brings.

So, today, I want to take a stab at doing that for you. You may find yourself having given up hope for 2018 based on 2017 as a whole, or in part. Well, it is not too late to change your approach. It is okay to hope.

What if 2018 becomes the year you do something great? What if 2018 becomes the year you accomplish that goal you’ve never seemed to achieve before? What if you have matured as a person to the point where the mistakes you made in your younger days will no longer provide as much resistance as you remember?

Let yourself, for just a moment, find hope and refreshing in the changing of the calendar, even if we are a few days behind.

Pick one thing you’d like to accomplish this year and write it in a place where it will serve as a reminder for you. Stick with it. Keep it in front of you. Pursue it. Achieve it.

Who knows, maybe 2018 will be the best year yet for both of us. I look forward to taking this journey with you.

Lessons Learned About Blogging, Pt 2

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It’s hard to believe I have been blogging for the majority of 2017. I’ve learned a few things along the way. You can read the first one here. Here’s my second thought:

Social Shares Rule

(disclaimer: this is not intended to guilt you into social sharing)

If I were to look back over the past 11 months and examine the views and page visits for my site, the days with the highest views were the days where someone shared a post, usually on Facebook.

I have done a little bit of work to get 3 Question Leadership optimized in search engines, but honestly: how many people google search the phrase “3 Questions for Leadership”? It’s actually lower than you think, even if you think it’s low.

So, what’s the best way to get what I’m posting out into the inter webs? Social shares.

If you have shared one of my posts over the past year, I would like to thank you for doing so. Every time I sit down to write, I hope to write something that connects with someone, so when you share, it means the world to me.

If you found me because someone shared a post on Facebook or Twitter, then that’s proof!

Lastly, if you worry about missing my posts on social media, I would love for you to sign up to receive the 3QL email. The daily email delivers at 10am on the days I post, so you never have to guess if I’m posting something because it will show up in your inbox.

Once again, thank you for taking this journey with me!

Lessons Learned about Blogging, pt 1

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Last December, I bought a domain and published my first post. Then, in February, I fully launched this blog. It has been an interesting journey, and I’d like to finish out 2017 by sharing a few things I’ve learned along the way.

1. Blogging takes time, both mine and yours.

That seems like a pretty obvious statement, but I had not done the math when I started. Posting 2-3 times each week is an interesting endeavor, and one that has helped me grow over the past 11 months.

But more than the time it takes me to write, edit, prep, and publish, is the time you take to read. If you have spent any time reading anything I’ve written, let me say thank you.

I know you have important things going on in your life and your time is being fought for everyday, so I appreciate the time you spend reading my ramblings.

Some days are shorter, like today. So let me close by saying I have had a blast over the past 11 months, and I’m thankful that you have joined me along the way, or stuck with me through the ups and downs. I’m looking forward to the future!